This Beach House Celebrates The Passage Of Time

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This Beach House Celebrates The Passage Of Time

This Beach House Celebrates The Passage Of Time

Architecture

by Amelia Barnes

Pleysier Perkins were engaged to rearrange and modestly extended this 1970s beach house.

The original footprint of the house was largely maintained, with the bulk of the renovation works completed around the kitchen and main bathroom.

‘We tend to celebrate how buildings are adapted over time and make the transitions between new and old subtly apparent with hallway thresholds, flooring, and level changes,’ explains Pleysier Perkins associate Georgina Oakley.

New full height sliding doors around the dining area open to reveal the outdoor deck.

Finger tiles create the kitchen splashback

The dining area and outdoor deck now seamlessly connect.

Pleysier Perkins took cues from the home’s original modernist-inspired features.

The extension adds 72 square metres to the home in the form of a glazed walkway and main bedroom suite.

The addition features full-height glazing to fully embrace its position in the garden designed by Amanda Oliver Gardens.

Shades of green across the bathroom tiles, new bedroom timber panelling and joinery throughout reflect the tones of the landscape beyond.

‘The green is also a constant conversation that is thread throughout the entirety of the home, allowing each space to have something in common with the next,’ says Pleysier Perkins associate Georgina Oakley.

The renovated main bathroom.

Terrazzo floor tiles feature throughout the bathrooms.

The en suite in the new addition.

From the street, the home remains entirely appropriate to the area while concealing light and bright updates within.

When coming into possession of a large beach block, it’s common to see new owners demolish the existing house on site and start over.

Koonya House by Pleysier Perkins takes a more sympathetic approach that recognises the house’s history and the character of the wider neighbourhood in Sorrento, on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula.

‘We tend to celebrate how buildings are adapted over time and make the transitions between new and old subtly apparent with hallway thresholds, flooring, and level changes,’ explains Pleysier Perkins associate Georgina Oakley.

In the words of Georgina, this original 1970s weatherboard house had ‘undergone a number of unfortunate alterations over the decades.’ In particular, its updated living spaces failed to capitalise on capturing north-facing outdoor areas and the generous surrounding gardens.

It was Pleysier Perkins’ job to rearrange these spaces, improve overall circulation, and add new accommodation, without significantly expanding the house.

The original footprint of the house was largely maintained, with the bulk of the renovation works completed around the kitchen and main bathroom.  New full height sliding doors around the dining area open to reveal the outdoor deck.

‘Here we used the north facing deck as the divider between new and old, to maintain the modest proportions of each built form,’ says Georgina. ‘The palette is what ties it all together.’

The extension adds 72 square metres to the home in the form of a glazed walkway and main bedroom suite.

Pleysier Perkins took cues from the home’s original modernist-inspired features when designing this space,  including the crazy paving chimney that inspired the bedroom’s stone floor finish and the flat roof. The external breeze blocks are a new feature that also nods to this era.

The addition features full-height glazing to fully embrace its position in the garden designed by Amanda Oliver Gardens.

Shades of green across the bathroom tiles, new bedroom timber panelling and joinery throughout reflect the tones of the landscape beyond.

‘The green is also a constant conversation that is thread throughout the entirety of the home, allowing each space to have something in common with the next,’ says Georgina. ‘Paired with stone and timber in a densely planted setting means the palette still feels natural, understated and integrated with its external surroundings.’

From the street, the home remains entirely appropriate to the area while concealing light and bright updates within.

True to Pleysier Perkins, the architecture is timeless, robust, and instils an overall sense of calm.

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